Not Ya Mama’s Cookin’!

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Like many others, I grew up watching sitcoms on television that depicted joyful, loving families who’d sit down together for meals that were often cooked by the mother. I had no idea that I was learning anything; I simply watched for my enjoyment. But, I was learning life-lessons about family dynamics, familial norms and expectations of motherhood.

Now that I’m a mom, I realize that these lessons learned subconsciously have caused me quite a bit of discomfort in myself as well as guilt and shame about my own ability (read: inability) to perform the expected duties of a mother. Due to my physical disability, my household doesn’t follow societal ‘norms.’ We have our own ‘normal.’ But although I’m aware of that, I nonetheless experience undeserved and unnecessary guilt because I’ve inadvertently placed expectations on myself as a parent; expectations I’m not able to live up to.

photo credit: iStock/CSA-Archive

Most recently, as my body has deteriorated, I’ve stopped being able to cook in our inaccessible kitchen. I started ordering deliveries from pizza places and delicatessens and we began to pick up more and more fast food. I knew my young child was no longer getting healthy meals and therefore was not consuming the necessary nutrients she needed for her holistic growth. But I felt helpless to change the situation. Until one evening, as I watched her eating yet another slice of pizza, I thought, “It’s my responsibility as her mom to make sure she eats healthy. If I can’t cook myself, then it’s still my responsibility to find a way for her to be healthy.”

The next day, I went about a month-long process of info-gathering. I searched for businesses that would deliver healthy, pre-cooked meals to our home. I finally narrowed the list down to two places, one national and one local. My daughter and I decided to try the local company first. We ordered only 2 meals, so we could try them and decide if we liked the food. We did!! So that week, I placed an order for a week’s worth of dinners to be delivered the following Monday.

When Monday dawned, I felt excited but also extremely nervous. I assumed that when the meals came, and I placed them in our fridge, I’d feel guilty that I wasn’t the one who provided them. But, the food came, and I placed the containers in our refrigerator and sat there staring into it at the shelf full of correctly-proportioned, healthy meals. I realized, maybe I wasn’t the one who cooked all this, but I am the one who provided it! I’m the one who did all the research into the various companies who offer food delivery services. I’m the one who ordered the meals. I fulfilled my responsibility as a mom to provide my daughter with healthy food!!

Many times, for me, it’s all about my perspective. When I find myself feeling negative about a situation, there’s nearly always a way to turn my attention to other aspects of it and see the positive side. I don’t need to follow societal norms! I’m not obligated to live up to anyone’s expectations! My parenting shouldn’t be judged based on how I get things done but rather that I do! My daughter and I have been eating delicious, healthy meals now for 3 weeks and I’m proud of myself for getting this done, for making the changes necessary to ensure that her needs are met.

 

*If you’d like a list of companies that deliver healthy, proportioned, precooked meals, feel free to email me at the address listed on this site.*

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School’s Touching Accommodations

If you are a parent, you know the feeling of pride that comes from watching your child(ren) perform in a school play or sing at an event; you’ve experienced the joy that occurs when you visit the classroom or engage in school activities with your child(ren). But, imagine if you had to stay outside the classroom door or couldn’t make it into the auditorium to watch the show. Imagine the feelings of guilt, sadness and separation you’d feel if you couldn’t participate the way every other parent was able to participate. Unfortunately, this happens more than you may think. When a parent uses a wheelchair, or doesn’t have the ability to climb stairs, there’s often no choice but for them to miss out on various aspects and events in their child(ren)’s life. For no other reason than structural inaccessibility, some disabled parents are placed in the awkward position of not being present in their child(ren)’s affairs. I’ve had to hear about my daughter’s classroom activities from other parents and it left me feeling embarrassed, guilt-ridden and upset. I’ve heard other ‘wheelie’ moms express anger, frustration, grief and humiliation at having to miss out on things because they couldn’t gain access into the venue.

When my daughter first started kindergarten at her new school, there were plenty of handicap parking spots available, but none were van accessible. The principal and school security officer both told me to simply make my own spot or take up 2 of the handicap spaces. So, for the first few months of school, that’s what I did. The school is extremely wheelchair accessible once inside – the entire layout of the lower and upper floors flows together via ramps and an elevator is in place. I’m able to go anywhere inside the school I need to go. But there was only one entrance that was level for my power chair to go through and it’s located at the main entrance, which is two schools down from the elementary school (the school itself contains preschool through high school). I would try my best to park near the main entrance whenever I arrived for school activities and then make my way through the high school and middle school to the elementary wing. I was able to attend all her class parties, her performances and the like. It was wonderful, and I had no complaints. I was simply happy to be able to go and be!

During the 3rd month of fall semester, the principal told me they’d put in a van spot for me right by the elementary school! I was excited and felt quite fortunate that the school had made accommodations for me. The only problem was that once I parked, I still had to trek up to the main entrance to get into the school. They had not realized there wasn’t a way into the elementary school for me. I told them it was no big deal (and this was true but on rainy days and as the weather got colder, it wasn’t the most ideal).

 

Right before Christmas break, I arrived one afternoon to pick up my daughter and a couple of faculty members approached me. They asked if I’d seen what the principal had made me. Apparently, the principal had decided not to waste time waiting for approval and necessary funds from the budget – he’d spent that day building me a ramp into the elementary school!! I was moved to tears! It sent me the message that I was just as important as the able-bodied parents; that I was wanted and needed there; that I was respected. They recognized my need to be with my child. My daughter’s school made it possible for me to have the same access as the other parents. But, it was what the Headmaster said to me that really meant a lot: he told me yes, it was done for me, but that it would be there for other parents like me in the future.

So, it seems that while they have given me two huge gifts in the form of making the building more accessible, I in return have given them a gift – the gift of awareness. I’m so thankful for all of this!! Using a wheelchair should never prevent me from being present in my daughter’s life but the reality is that it has. And there will be more times in the future that it will. But, as society becomes more aware of the existence of parents with special needs and is educated about the need for accommodations, disabled parents will gain equal access in places such as schools, gyms, auditoriums, etc. There will be a day when we no longer experience our child(ren)’s lives vicariously but are fully engaged as we are meant to be.

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Not All Spaces Are Created Equally

Yesterday, I was out running errands and stopped at one of the stores on my list. There were two handicap parking spaces available, but I couldn’t park and do my shopping. Why? Because I drive a wheelchair accessible van and can therefore, ONLY use VAN accessible spaces. The store had one van accessible space, but it was being used by a compact car.

Many people do not realize that there is a difference between regular handicap parking and handicap parking that’s accessible for vans. Before I began using my power chair, I myself was guilty of parking in any open handicap spot on the days I needed one, unaware that if I parked in a van accessible spot when there were other spots available, I was potentially blocking entry or exit into that establishment for someone who used a van.

The tale-tell difference between the two types of handicap parking is the width of the slanted lines next to the parking space. In order for a spot to be van accessible, the lines must be wider than they are for a typical spot. The reason? In order for me to exit my vehicle, I must have room to lower my ramp/lift (most often found on the right-side of the vehicle) and then have more room to roll completely off the ramp/lift. This is especially important to me as a parent with a young child, who I must keep safe.

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Drivers of modified vehicles CAN NOT use a regular handicap parking spot!

Back to my errands: I pulled in a spot directly across from the parking space I needed and waited…

and waited…

and waited – a full 10 minutes!

Finally, the lady came out of the store and began to unload her groceries. As she finished, I pulled out and signaled that I was waiting for the space. The lady was elderly and when she noticed me, she wagged her finger at me while giving me a disapproving look; no doubt believing I was ‘too young’ to need that space. She got in her car and proceeded to put on make-up, read mail and make me wait an additional 8 minutes! Thank goodness I was spiritually fit and sat there patiently – no fingers flew up; the window stayed up; my mouth stayed shut and I didn’t even toot my horn!! She finally pulled out and drove past me slowly, shaking her head.

If you must use a handicap parking space, bear in mind the next time you’re out & about, that if there are other spots open, to use them. Please leave the van accessible spaces for those of us who need the extra-wide slanted lines in order to safely exit our vehicles, some of us with our small children. Thanks!