Special (Needs) Delivery!

Pizza Box Delivery Boy Man Concept Knocking at Customer Door Wall Background Retro Cartoon Design Vector Illustration

Credit: iStock.com/Meilun

My daughter and I enjoy going out to eat from time-to-time. There are times, too, when it’s much more convenient or comfortable to stay at home and order food to be delivered. We like pizza, Chinese and there’s a local deli that’s fabulous and offers delivery service. However, after several experiences with delivery drivers over the past year, something’s been swirling around in my busy brain so I’ve decided to write about it. I’m hoping it’s a chance to create an open-dialogue with businesses that offer delivery services about how to make accommodations for people with disabilities. It is often a company’s policy to prohibit their drivers from entering a home while making their deliveries. Having worked for a national pizza-chain, I understand that this is for the drivers’ safety. That being said, I wonder if the policy must be so black-and-white or if a gray area exists?

I’ve lived at my current address for several years and am a ‘regular’ customer of the eateries around my neighborhood. When ordering online, I write on my ticket “Disabled – may need help bringing food inside. Thank you!” When I call in an order, I ask that a note be made using nearly that exact wording. Yet, upon arrival with my food, I’ve had drivers tell me they can’t come in; it’s against the rules. Now, please picture me opening the door either using my cane with a wide foot-base or my power chair and perhaps you’ll see the gray area. I’m obviously not a threat to them and my appearance matches the comment on my ticket. Because of my balance issues, I’m only able to carry one thing into the kitchen at a time. This can take a couple of minutes because we usually have more than one box or we’ve also ordered drinks. Twice, I’ve had drivers tell me they’re “in a hurry, ma’am” or “have other deliveries waiting.” THAT’S a tad irritating because I’ve asked for help, it’s been declined so I’m doing the best I can do.

Let me make it clear that I’m not asking for special privileges due to my disability. I’m asking that the same accommodations that are made when I’m dining in a particular food establishment be made when I’m ordering in from that same business. I also understand that rules are rules yet I’m arguing that there are circumstances in life which can alter the necessity or validity of rules.

I’d like to make a suggestion to businesses that offer delivery services: Please notice the gray areas. There’s typically a section called “Special Instructions” customers can fill out when placing online orders – please make the necessary modifications or stretch the rules a bit in order to meet the needs of your customers with special needs. Just as the ADA grants those of us with disabilities the right to utilize and enjoy your restaurant while dining-in, please grant us the ability to do likewise when you’re bringing your services into our homes.

 

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Product Review – EazyHold

EazyHold the Universal Cuff Grip Assist has been a very helpful addition to my treasure trove of modifications. I came across EazyHold on a social media site, where the creators were holding a give-away contest. I was one of the winners and my adult pack of EazyHolds arrived shortly thereafter.

eazyhold

The package contains 5 different sizes of the Grip Assist, a company business card and a short description of the product along with ideas of ways to use EazyHold

EazyHold comes in 5 different sizes and attaches to a wide range of household items. Once fitted to an item, such as an eating utensil, the user inserts their hand into the grip and can then hold onto the utensil without having to grasp the item at all during use. It’s great for people with limited to no ability to grip things as well as for people like me, who can’t hold onto certain things for a long length of time.

 

There are seemingly endless items of daily use with which an EazyHold can be attached. The different sizes come with varying degrees of length and flexibility. The largest one even fits onto my home phone handset. I’ve currently got the smallest EazyHold attached to a pen at my desk. This product, of which a patent is still pending, has allowed me to use my hairbrush and toothbrush without experiencing pain in my hands and fingers; lessened the probability of weakness or joints ‘locking up’ while I use certain things around the house; and has decreased the risk of me dropping things. I highly recommend it!!

I can also tell you how nice the inventors of EazyHold are. They have contacted me a few times by email and have encouraged me to stay in touch with them. They seem to truly care that their invention is making a positive difference in the lives of its users. I’ve been very impressed with their friendliness and concern!

 

If you have trouble gripping things or tend to drop things while you’re using them, I’d strongly suggest you get in touch with EazyHold!! And, if you’re the parent or caregiver of a child with grip difficulty, you’ll be happy to know that EazyHold also offers children’s packs!

 

You can find EazyHold at their website: eazyhold.com

They are also on FaceBook: facebook.com/eazyhold