Walkin’ & Rollin’ Thanks to ADA!

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Before I became disabled, I knew what the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was and the reason it was implemented. I understood on a cognitive level why it was important. But when it’s significance became personal to me, the journey from the head to the heart was complete. Now, as a parent with a disability, the ADA is vital in the day-to-day lives of me and my child. For the purposes of simplicity, I’m going to focus on the area of the ADA which most effects me as a disabled parent – the compliance of public buildings, parks, venues, etc. to grant me complete participation in the activities which the business provides. Public places are required to make sure that I’m able to share experiences with my able-bodied peers in equal measure or as close to it as possible. I’m not to be denied the ability to either access or use public facilities.

As a parent, these ADA requirements mean the most to me. I’ve dealt with feelings of guilt a lot as a disabled parent. I want the most typical childhood possible for my daughter; I don’t want my physical limitations to limit her engagement or enjoyment in kid-centered activities; I’ve worried about her having consequences for something neither of us has any control over. Unlike my able-bodied friends who are themselves parents, I’ve shown up to a few birthday parties for my child’s friends and not been able to enter. We’ve arrived at parks and have not been able to play on all of the equipment because I could not access the areas. My daughter is currently 5-years-old so you can imagine the disappointment and, in the past, the lack of understanding why we had to leave without doing what we’d gone there to do. Each time this has happened, my heart has broken for her and I’ve felt nearly crushed by guilt and the realization that it’s all my body’s fault. There have been times I’ve managed to push through the pain and mobility difficulties so that she can have fun but those times have been rare.

Handicap_Accessible_SignWith accessibility issues becoming more widely recognized and businesses making necessary structural changes in order to meet the needs of the entire public, my daughter and I are able to do more and more. We’ve taken advantage of modifications at the skating rink so I could roll along with her on the rink; we go to theaters that have wheelchair seating in the front or on the sides as opposed to in the very back where our view is hardly worth the price of admission; we go to a local park that’s well-paved around the playground so I can keep an eye on her while she plays; we go to the library; and recently spent a week at the beach together thanks to the city’s efforts to make the area more accessible!! Also, at birthday parties that are held in bouncy-place type venues, arcades and other exciting kid-friendly places I’m able to enjoy the fun right along with my daughter and the other parents.

I would like to see stricter ADA guidelines and enforcement in the future. However, our society has come a long way and I feel grateful to live during a time when awareness, advocacy and education concerning the disability community are flourishing. My hope is that I can be a part of the ongoing changes and positive impacts made for people with disabilities. I hope an able-bodied person will read this blog and try to empathize with some of the feelings and situations I’ve mentioned so that they might understand the importance of the ADA not only on a cognitive level but on a spiritual and emotional one as well.

Thanks to the ADA I have rights, I’m protected and I’m free to be who I am – not stunted and fettered because of what I have, a disability. Because of the ADA, my daughter and I are able to enjoy family outings, have fun and “walk & roll!”

 

**This blog post first appeared on The Disabled Parenting Project – http://disabledparenting.com/walking-rolling-daughter-thanks-ada/ **

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